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Morpeth Clock Tower

Morpeth Clock Tower

 The Morpeth Clock Tower is one of Morpeth's most famous landmarks. Standing at roughly 70 ft high, tucked away in the corner of the Market Place it is now dwarfed by more modern constructions. The walls are 3'6" thick

The Clock Tower was constructed sometime between 1604 and 1634 out of Medieval Stone thought to have come from a gatehouse that previously stood at the west end of Oldgate to protect the town from marauding raiders from the north. During its time it has served as many functions to the town including a gaol until 1802and a meat store to name but a few. The tower acquired a peal of six bells cast by the prominent bell founder Richard Phelps (Whitechapel Bell Foundry) in 1706 at the request of Major General Edmond Maine, MP of Morpeth. These bells were originally intended to be made for the Parish Church of Berwick-upon-Tweed, however, the people of Berwick failed to elect the Major General to Office some years earlier. This gave rise to the curious local saying that "Berwick Bells are heard in Morpeth." The bells fell into disprepair throughout the early half of the 20th Century and were eventually recast and hung in a new cast iron frame in 1951 by John Taylor & Co to commemorate

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